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【台詞コーナー】攻殼機動隊・・・全部だよ/ Exact Japanese Dialog Transcripts for Ghost In the Shell, Son!

[Update 2011/07/30@0917 JST: The old transcript site died, but a new one has been found by enterprising AJATTeers! Right here: 攻殻機動隊関連 : 攻殻機動隊 : CMSB. Also, as a precaution against deletion (domestic Japanese site setup and maintenance prices are about ten times higher than the US, leading to high website attrition), there’s a mirror of this site archived at gits.ajatt.com . Please use the actual site as far as possible, though, ‘coz I think its owner earns ad revenue or something that way…I dunno. Plus they would prolly get a kick out of all the visitors 😀 ]

Hey all you boys and girls. Continuing our ongoing series of transcribed Japanese stuff, it happens that just as I was about to start doing it myself, I found that someone had already done it. Done what?

Transcribed all of 攻殼機動隊/Ghost in the Shell (GITS)! That’s right! All the movies [except Solid State Society] and of course all episodes of Stand Alone Complex. The dialog, baby. All of it. In Japanese! Exactly as spoken on-screen.

Those who have looked will know that Japanese/East Asian movies and TV shows that have same-language subs at all, let alone subs that exactly match dialog, are a rare and precious thing indeed. Like, I bet you’ll practically watch a mediocre show just because it has subs (depending on the language, I know I would). Some of the reasons for this are pretty decently summed up here.

GITSGITS notably has no Japanese subs on any of its present DVD releases, despite easily being one of the densest, most literary (is that even the right word?) programs of any kind ever made. Japanese subs for GITS would have been nice. But, whatever, now we have this website — with copy-and-pastable text to boot! W00t.

So, yeah, enjoy. By the way, I would definitely recommend this kind of thing for sentence-picking. And if any of you are inclined to make sentence packs or SRS files for people, this kind of thing, i.e. Japanese by and for native speakers, would IMHO be the best for, like, the health of the world, and in terms of source material [since, as we all know, material made for learners often tends to be some combination of boring and unrealistic].

As an aside, let it also be noted that Ghibli’s 物の怪姫/Princess Mononoke also has exact subs on its Japanese DVD release. Just FYI.

And we’re done! Enjoy!

  60 comments for “【台詞コーナー】攻殼機動隊・・・全部だよ/ Exact Japanese Dialog Transcripts for Ghost In the Shell, Son!

  1. David
    December 17, 2008 at 12:55

    This.. is spectacular! I’ve always respected GITS for sometimes stumping me entirely in English. And, I’ve been at this English thing for 19 years. Go figure.

    But this is excellent. I’m definitely going to spend a good while mining this down to the last syllable. An excellent find Khatzumoto.

    This is a bit off-topic, but I’d like to ask for some advice. I have read and reread this website in its entirety several times. (You know how you read something once and understand it, but read it again later when the information may serve more relevance, that happens a lot here. Heh). But, I digress. (<- Picked that up from here.)

    I’ve been working my way through Tae Kim’s guide to give my self a foundation in grammar, by taking the example sentences. I counted over 700 example sentences in its entirety, minus the ones he points out as being erroneous. I’m planning on getting UBJG (Understanding Basic Japanese Grammar), and I recall you saying it had around 2,000 example sentences. I also remember you mentioning that Momoko had put just about all of them in her SRS. Along with these, and two other resources, All About Particles, and 13 Secrets to Speaking Fluent Japanese, are the bilingual resources in which I’m pulling examples from. (I’m currently around 200 sentence items).

    My count of the examples is pretty off, but I figured it to be over 3,200 in all. I don’t actually think I’ll have all of them entered in my SRS, but you never know. This is where my question comes in. I wanted to try and make the switch to monolingual dictionaries as close to now as possible. I remember reading that you mentioned having made the switch around 500-1,000 sentences.

    Do you think it’s still good to pull from these bilingual sources (to get the sentence item), but only give Japanese definitions (so, basically ignoring the bilingual part altogether)? Or, do you think it would just be better to forget about the bilingual stuff and, once I feel able, just use native source (like manga that I’m buying). The issue is that I feel that I’d like to have a strong foundation in grammatical patterns to gain a preemtive edge on “monodics” (<- Love that term). What I’m worried about is, not gaining the benefit of having taken sentences from these sources (which, I feel are excellent starting material).

    Let me know what you think about this. Please.

  2. David
    December 17, 2008 at 13:00

    A few things I think I left out were that I was planning on making my switch to monodics using that same children’s dictionary that Momoko used/uses. And, that I wanted to make the switch at that 500-1,000 sentence mark like you did. I feel at the way I’m progressing through these sentences items that that might be a good time for the switch.

    Which raises another question I just thought of. Do you think it’s possible to make the switch even sooner if one is going to use that children’s dictionary?

  3. khatzumoto
    December 17, 2008 at 13:10

    @David
    >just use native source
    yes

    >do you think it’s possible to make the switch even sooner
    Definitely. I think the monodic switch could be made with even a 100-word vocabulary…or, even from 0, especially with an RTK kanji knowledge+furigana.

  4. David
    December 17, 2008 at 13:18

    Wow, that was immensely fast. Thanks for that.

    Ah, okay. Native sources it is.

    Even from a 0 vocabulary. That’s interesting. I think I’d just be worried that I would be misunderstanding when it came to some compounds. But, I guess if you were trying to go off a 0 vocabulary then it would be wiser to start with those single Kanji words (no mistaking it there since Heisig was the preamble to sentences). I might just have to give this a try! I definitely have more than 100-word vocabulary to go off of anyways. So, I’ll take your word for it, and try. If it works then I’m going to be extremely happy because I can already feel the English polluting my understanding of Japanese.

  5. Brad
    December 17, 2008 at 13:34

    @Khatz

    You’ve just made me feel very guilty for not going monodic already. Rectifying that now, then. You’re always an inspiration, thanks.

  6. David
    December 17, 2008 at 13:47

    I just gave it a try with a few really simple words (in my opinion) on Sanseido. Words like 女, 白い, and あそこ. I noticed that the definitions for 女 and 白い were really easy. Especially knowing ahead of time what it all meant in the first place. But, it gives you a bit of insight on how that recursive process starts and ends on a small scale. 女 = (対)男. And, 白い = (対)黒い. あそこ was a little more complicated, but I think is still understandable with Kanji knowledge: あそこ = あの場所. (<- This may require another look up for あの if you weren’t familiar with it). But, I can definitely see how things just grow from a small vocab just using Kanji as an aid.

    Thanks for that push Khatzumoto. I think that’s what I needed.

  7. Nukemarine
    December 17, 2008 at 13:48

    David, hold up, I got some other advice for you. But more on that later.

    Khatz, there’s some other resources for the Japanese Sub hungry culture. See, I like to watch subs as the show goes on. I’m not the type (ok, I’m not at the level) where I want to stop and look up everything I don’t understand. That turns watching TV into work, which was not fun for me. This’ll go back to what I’ll tell David. Anyway, for me, I don’t think there’s a need to sentence mine Japanese shows, movies and manga.

    On d-addict drama torrent site, there’s some Japanese sub-title files for some shows that will sync to your drama shows. Not all are there, but it gives you something. Zettai Kareshi, Gokusen 3, and Rookies are amoung the selection. There’s a russian site that also has a collection of ripped subtitles, including a lot of Ghibli movies, in addition to other dramas like Last Christmas (AWESOME SHOW), Bakuyakou, Hana Yori Dango and Nodame wo Produce. As I found shows that had exact subs on DVD, most notably the very funny Nodama Cantabile (watching this completely in Japanese, HILARIOUS). Anyway, I don’t think you need be limited to lousy shows.

    It’s with watching all these fine shows (with Japanese subtitles) that I began to see where my learning (studying) method didn’t mesh entirely with what’s on AJATT.

    Here’s what I found out (for me). Your sentences from Tae Kim are enough for grammar. There’s no need to recreate what you’re learning by adding on Understanding Basic Japanese Grammar. Use one or the other. Plus, for these Grammar sentences, don’t turn them into production cards nor sweat the vocabulary in them. What I mean is, since these sentences are made to teach grammar, only use mistakes in grammar when reading them to count as a miss. Reason I say this is the vocabulary will be repetitive. Producing these over, and over, and over again will make this learning process very tedious.

    Next, build up vocabulary sentences. Again, I differ from Khatz on this now. I say, use resources like iKnow.co.jp or the sentences from KO2001. Now these should be production and recognition. More importantly, these could use the audio (or TTS) as part of the production side. But here’s the switch. You don’t care about missing any part of the sentence except for that one vocabulary word. Yeah, kick yourself for not realizing this is in the past polite area, but the sentence was testing “交差点”. So knowing the meaning and how to write it from just hearing it was the only failing point. Even better, if you use KO2001, use the sentences to learn one vocabulary word on the side (easy to do as they mark them with numbers). If a sentence has three vocabulary words in it, recreate it three times, once for each word. Break that sentence up if the vocabulary isn’t in a part of it.

    Why am I say this? Wasn’t AJATT about mining sources you liked? No, that was how Khatz did it, and it will work with some people. No, the AJATT was listening and watching and reading AJATT. And here’s what I found out: After learning a grammar point via a sentence, or every word I learned via a sentence from iKnow made the Manga, and Dramas I watched more enjoyable. Why? Because these items popped up in the drama. I didn’t break the flow of the manga or drama to learn that point, it was already there. So the more grammar and vocabulary I built up, the better the dramas became. That in turn kind of made me want to learn more vocabulary.

    Ok, so maybe I shouldn’t say “Do it this way instead”. What I mean is Khatz is a smart kat who knows who he is, and is humble about it. I’m now at a point where I see what’s working for me and what isn’t. I also think there will be those that are like me, so can be spared some initial heart-ache. I found out doing production on grammar sentences will burn you out. I found doing production on the entire sentence over and over again will burn you out. I found failing a sentence based on missing any one part will burn you out. For me, I found mining sentences from stuff I liked to watch would burn me out. In the process, I glommed onto a working formula.

    And all this pretty much became a realization by watching Japanese dramas that I liked with Japanese subtitles.

    Put it this way: Tae Kim has 750 sentences that help teach grammar. iKnow has 6000 common words with sentences that help teach vocabulary. For Thor’s sake, do not wait till you finish these to start watching fun Japanese stuff. Those items will pop up in the stuff you watch, listen and read. Then you’ll notice stuff that you’ve watched is popping up in new stuff you learn. Just make sure you’re watching and listening and reading all the time.

  8. December 17, 2008 at 14:00

    I think some of the links on this page are broken.

  9. scout
    December 17, 2008 at 14:02

    Hmm… gispki.myhome.cx is timing out. I wonder if we’ve finally discovered the AJATT effect?

    (Sorry in advance to those who don’t get the Slashdot reference.)

  10. Beck
    December 17, 2008 at 15:33

    I’m pretty sure all the ghibli movies have exact subs, and they’re pretty easy to find online. Here’s the link to the Russian site Nukemarine mentioned forum.koohii.com/viewtopic.php?id=1719

    The (awesome) Crayon Shinchan movies I’ve seen have subs too (ヘンダーランドの大冒険 and ブリブリ王国の秘宝)

    Actually every time I’ve seen a Japanese show/movie with subs they’ve been exact or pretty damn close. It’s only the dub/sub combos that suck, so just don’t expect to buy a Hollywood movie with 日本語字幕 listed and get exact subs.

  11. nacest
    December 17, 2008 at 17:19

    I present you with the exact transcription of the whole 電脳コイル (Dennou Coil) Series: www36.atwiki.jp/dennou-coil/pages/36.html
    Just click on 【字幕】. The scripts are strangely formatted but, you know, it’s better than nothing!

    And thanks for GITS, Khatz!

  12. uberstuber
    December 17, 2008 at 17:49

    The link’s not working T_T

  13. wenhailin
    December 17, 2008 at 19:21

    hey khatz, did you ever have any luck hearing from Disney about the subtitles for their chinese dubbed stuff?

  14. scoff
    December 17, 2008 at 20:11

    Most of the Chinese stuff I download has subs and it really makes life easier. Sometimes with Mandarin shows it feels like a crutch, but I’d be completely lost watching some of the Cantonese stuff coming out of HK without subs (that get processed in my head as Mandarin…is that bad?).

  15. December 17, 2008 at 22:31

    This is great! I have been looking for something like this, Thanks Khatz!

  16. gyabo
    December 18, 2008 at 01:33

    that’s great, thank you very much for the links!

    jdrama.cc/forum/blog.php?u=1 has the Japanese caption of the current J-dramas online, and another very cool site is www.viikii.net/ . It’s a quite new subtitle site where caption and subs in every language can be added to videos of popular streaming sites. There isn’t that much content until now, but some anime and Jdrama with Japanese caption and even Kdrama with Japanese subtitle is already online. And recently they even added a feature for language learners where you can save the sentences you like for later reviewing! <3

  17. David
    December 18, 2008 at 02:53

    @Nukemarine

    > I’m not the type (ok, I’m not at the level) where I want to stop and look up everything I don’t understand. That turns watching TV into work, which was not fun for me.

    My solution to this problem is rather simple. Plus, you don’t need to wear out your pause button so early on. Since I always have Japanese playing in at least one ear (24 hrs a day) I have so many opportunities to hear things. Everyday this week I’ve picked up another word that I had learned before while listening to the first bunch of episodes of Death Note. It is these words and others that I hear over and over and I just have to know that i go look up. And, this process repeats, I’ll coninue to hear words that come up in my sentence items and so I’ll look them up and get more sentences. This way I don’t have to stop the fun and go put something into my SRS.

    Another thing that I’ve done, is, while watching Neon Genesis Evangelion, I’ll grab words that get my attention (for whatever reason). Look them up, and get a sentence with them. One instance of this was the episode before the episode that Asuka was going to be introduced. I caught the name of the title 来日(らい・にち), looked it up and got a sentence for it.

    To me, these are the rewarding things because they are the things that got my attention. Over time, this will coninue to happen, until eventually, I’ll get it. I know eventually I’ll want to pick up that remote and wear my pause button out. But for now, I’m just enjoying flowing in a stream of Japanese and picking things up as I go.

    > Anyway, I don’t think you need be limited to lousy shows.

    I think that’s all a matter of opinion. I personally like Ghost in the Shell, and if it’s as complex in vocabulary as what I’ve heard in English (I’ve caught it on Adult Swim a few times before I started this Japanese thing), then I’m going to feel like a king when I learn and understand it all. : )

    > Here’s what I found out (for me). Your sentences from Tae Kim are enough for grammar. There’s no need to recreate what you’re learning by adding on Understanding Basic Japanese Grammar. Use one or the other.

    I kind of figured that Tae Kim’s guide would be enough for grammar, but I like the idea of having 2000 sentences to pick from as a supplement to the ones I pull from Tae Kim’s guide. I also have “Japanese in MangaLand” (all three volumes) that I pull from the Manga examples in the book to see everything used in multiple contexts. Along with this, I use All About Particles if I’m unclear on the uses of some particles. For instance, the は particle being used for ephasis in a て-form +いる. I figure if I’m building a foundation I might as well pull from various sources and get as many points (quantity) as possible.

    > Plus, for these Grammar sentences, don’t turn them into production cards nor sweat the vocabulary in them. What I mean is, since these sentences are made to teach grammar, only use mistakes in grammar when reading them to count as a miss. Reason I say this is the vocabulary will be repetitive. Producing these over, and over, and over again will make this learning process very tedious.

    I’m not sure what you mean by production. From what I know of Anki, that means looking at English and giving the Japanese for it. Which is a big no. It’s error proned and too hard to do anyways. But, I think you might mean dictation cards, where one listens to audio and then writes the sentence ater parroting it back orally.

    I feel that every sentence item should be understood in full. If I go through the trouble of making the card, it’s something I wanted to know. I also think that learning vocabulary mixed with grammar is a rather fun challenge.

    > Next, build up vocabulary sentences.

    Vocabulary will come naturally as I collect sentences. It’s inevitable because each sentence is bound to have something I didn’t know alreay. Especially in these early stages. So, I’m not worried about it. Some days I want to know more vocab, so I spend more time in my dictionaries and looking up words from example sentences to get more example sentences that have words I don’t know and it kind of branches off from there.

    > Again, I differ from Khatz on this now. I say, use resources like iKnow.co.jp or the sentences from KO2001. Now these should be production and recognition. More importantly, these could use the audio (or TTS) as part of the production side.

    I don’t agree with iKnow.co.jp. Too much English, even when they’re trying to teach you Japanese. It reminds me a lot of Rosetta Stone, only with tons more English. And I didn’t like Rosetta Stone to begin with because the material was boring and, since I’m a number lover like Khatzumoto, I like to see the number of my sentence items increase steadily over time as kind of a meter. This is not to say that the 10,000 is the be all end all, because it isn’t. And, I’ve thrown out a few here and there because I didn’t like the sentence, or I thought it was boring, or whatever. I like this freedom. And, that doesn’t happen with iKnow and Rosetta Stone.

    > But here’s the switch. You don’t care about missing any part of the sentence except for that one vocabulary word.

    I’m a perfectionist, so this won’t work for me. If I get it wrong, it’s wrong. There are some instances where I can say “ok, I was just writing to fast” and end up not writing the ゃ in じゃ, or something like that. Like I’ve said, I prefer getting grammar and vocab at the same time.

    > Why am I say this? Wasn’t AJATT about mining sources you liked?

    Erm, yeah.. it was. I mean, why would I want to pull from something I didn’t like / thought was boring. One of the ideas behind the JIM (Japanese Immersion environMent) was that it serves as a sentence source. And, if I’m immersing myself in it, it’s going to be something I like, and therefore, I’ll want to know what’s going on. It’s a driving force. So, pulling from interesting things is definitely a part of it.

    > Ok, so maybe I shouldn’t say “Do it this way instead”. What I mean is Khatz is a smart kat who knows who he is, and is humble about it. I’m now at a point where I see what’s working for me and what isn’t.

    Well, even if you did say “do it this way instead” it probably wouldn’t roll over well with some people. Khatzumoto is indeed intelligent, and generous. And what I mean by that is, he had the sense to say “hey, you know what, there’s probably a bunch of people that could probably benefit from knowing about Antimoon, SRS, and Stephen Krashen.” My life has changed a lot after reading this blog and Antimoon, SuperMemo’s site and Krashens articles and books. What I’m getting at here is that Khatzumoto hasn’t been wrong about any of this stuff so far, from what I can tell in my own Japanese project. So, deviations are minor.

    > I found mining sentences from stuff I liked to watch would burn me out.

    This is unfortunate. I’m surprised that you don’t get burnt out pulling from sources that aren’t interesting.

    > Tae Kim has 750 sentences that help teach grammar. iKnow has 6000 common words with sentences that help teach vocabulary. For Thor’s sake, do not wait till you finish these to start watching fun Japanese stuff.

    I’m not waiting for anything. I’ve pulled from all over the place. Most from dictionaries. And, the fact that dictionaries are something I can trust for being legit in their content, I feel comfortable with them. Especially since I can look up any words that I want. Sounds like fun to me. Plus, since my current goal is to go monolingual, I want to get a feel for these dictionaries.

    Sorry if this reply was a total rejection to your ideas. I just don’t think it’s a good idea to pull from something I don’t like so, by product, I learn stuff from that which I do like. I’d rather pull right from the stuff I do like, and reap the rewards instantly, rather than waiting. Which, in turn makes me feel confident and so I press on. I’m big on the motivation thing. I think that I’m very self motivated sometimes, but I know I’m not. I need results, and knowing things from stuff that I like is pretty great. I do admit that learning things by product of doing other things (i.e. learning a sentence then hearing it again in a show you like that’s different form the source you initially pulled from).

  18. David
    December 18, 2008 at 03:09

    @Nukemarine cont.

    And, I realized I should probably add this. — I’m not trying to argue who’s method is better. I’m just letting you know my preferences, since you said it was advice for me. I do appreciate that you spent the time to write that up. I did take something from it.

  19. Hashiriya
    December 18, 2008 at 07:42

    thanks for the transcription Khatz… i bookmarked it for future studies 😉

  20. Nukemarine
    December 18, 2008 at 10:41

    David,

    The biggest thing is don’t sweat about changing up your method later on down the line if it’s not working for you. I’ll argue that the AJATT is the media entertainment as much as possible. The 10,000 sentence method is just the Japanese learning part of it. Like others, I got a bit distracted on the sentences.

    Anyway, Tae Kim (and UBJG) use ALOT of English. You use that as a quick short cut in the beginning. Hey, you have ALL these things called “Vocabulary” that’s in the bubble called “English” which mesh now and again with vocabulary from “Japanese”. Why am I sounding condescending? Cause let’s replace Japanese with Kanji. Most likely, if you started Japanese here, then you started Kanji here. You did not ignore English at this time, you used it as a short cut.

    Plus, if you have no problem with Tae Kim or UBJG, you should have no problem with sentences from iKnow. I’m not saying to use the website’s SRS. The cool thing is you can use the API feed and bulk download all the sentences and audio to use with your own SRS. Plus, you’re probably only thinking about the Core Series. As this is a community site, users will input their own sentences. You’ll see they’ll take a YouTube clip of Hana Yori Dango, and provide the sentences and audio samples from that clip. Plus, I think the developers will incorporate a J-J dictionary in it’s definitions of words (they’ve already incorporated dozens of languages), which ups the value even more in my opinion.

    Here’s a sample from Moetry in Motion www.iknow.co.jp/lists/23032-14

    I must appologize. I tend to write my responses in more broad application terms. That means I suggest and say things to the entire reading audience and not one particular person. That bit about being limited to lousy shows was in response to Khatz thinking some are watching lousy shows that have exact subs, where I don’t think there’s that limit. Also, saying to not wait till you begin immersion was not aimed at you, it was just a thinking flow. That also means I have no problem if you in particular dismiss my suggestions, as others may find them beneficial.

    Yes, I did mean dictation cards in my post. I’ll start using the term “Dictation” cards instead of production, less confusion that way. I’m a perfectionist, but it worked against me here. In addition, getting away from perfectionism in my sentences allowed me to get more sentences in the rotation. Yeah, I might know 1400 sentences with 90% clarity (it’s higher actually). But that’s better than when I was bottlenecking at 500 sentences demanding 100% perfection. Just a different mindset. I likened to Khatz’ post about breaking up sentences. Hell, that post helped me realize what I’m doing wrong and I added to it. So yeah, I can have a long sentence (though most are short), but that doesn’t matter as I’m only dictating one word in that sentence. That one word must be perfect. The rest of it is likely perfect, but if not, I just go “grr” and still pass the card. That part I missed is covered in another card or will be in time. It’s odd, by not writing out the entire sentence in dictation review, I’m actually writing more and writing more sentences. Part of this is I do write out the entire sentence when I add it to the deck. By pulling back from the demanding perfection, it opened up more controlled output.

    Plus, by reading Antimoon, it does dawn on me that understanding the full flavor of sentence can come later. So now I’m thinking Kanji (rtk), then Grammar (Tae Kim), then Vocabulary (iKnow). For you maybe, it’s kanji, then grammar sentences (Tae Kim plus UBJG), then Vocabulary (various). Then comes the polishing, the understanding all parts of a sentence. Why did this one use へ and ~んだね while another with exact same words に and ~の. That polishing is down the road for me. Know what though? This is all the studying part anyway. We’re all going to get our own method in time here. Hopefully in all this, we’re all experiencing Japanese.

  21. David
    December 18, 2008 at 13:05

    Nukemarine,

    Hah, you have a good attitude. It doesn’t sound like you took anything personal there. Thanks for understanding. Well, I don’t know much about iKnow, other than what I’ve experienced, and it had a lot of English and single words. And, I’m not into learning single words. Just a tad boring for me if there isn’t a sentence it’s being used in. That, and like they describe on Antimoon, learning things in context like that means that you are programming your brain to use the word correctly.

    The way I do things fits my personality. I want it all at once. I don’t want to wait for vocabulary, nor do I want to wait to learn a certain speech pattern.

    Anyways, thanks for the suggestions. I’ll look into downloading those sentences. My only concern there is if they are correct or not. Kind of a “too good to be true” attitude I suppose.

  22. Hashiriya
    December 18, 2008 at 15:15

    all of iKnow’s core words have sentences that they are used in… that’s the way it works… try it for a day >_< it’s led to huge results for me!! they are supposed to go up to 10,000 words (which of course makes 10,000 sentences) by the end of this year…. i’ve studied around 1,700 words so far and i feel that i am really really making progress… the audio with all the sentences is a huge plus… i feel that Khatz should review the website himself but i don’t know if he will or not… he might be interested since the next courses are going to be in Chinese… (see here Khatz www.iknow.co.jp/lists/35430 ) there are many paths to learning any language of course 😉

  23. KREVA
    December 19, 2008 at 04:13

    The benefit to iKnow is the audio that comes with the sentences. And I don’t think there’s too much English in, just a sentence (in Japanese), a translation (which you don’t have to use if it’s too much english or if you are going monodic, but might be beneficial for beginners like me who only has 250 sentences. hehe), and accompanying audio spken by fluent speakers. Sounds like a deal to me. I have yet to try iKnow, but I might be checking it out to see what it’s like. I use a hybrid method between Kanji Odyssey and media (books, movies, shows etc.) to pick sentences. The Kanji Odyssey helps me build the basic foundation of kanji readings and vocabulary while the media sentence picking gets me some of the more advance stuff I keep hearing early on.

  24. dancc
    December 19, 2008 at 06:07

    Does anyone know where I can find the transcipts for Trick or Tiger & Dragon? I haven’t been able to find them online.

  25. Chris41188
    December 19, 2008 at 10:22

    Cool, i still waiting to find ones for samurai champloo and cowboy bebop, i found korean dvd versions on yes asain with japanese subs on to rip but they were out of stock 🙁

  26. Beck
    December 19, 2008 at 10:56
  27. beneficii
    December 19, 2008 at 14:54

    For those into Diplomacy, and I bet there’s a few here that are, there is a Japanese Diplomacy hobby! Right here:

    asagi.la.coocan.jp/diplomacy/

    You can sign up for a game. Just invent a log-in and log-in with it and that will be your log-in/password!

    You can also read the negotiations between the players in completed games! Input!

  28. nest0r
    December 19, 2008 at 17:04

    Damn, whenever I find sites like this I get suddenly paranoid that they’ll go down before I can use them. Somebody hurry and download it all into one big file for me, kthx.

  29. nest0r
    December 19, 2008 at 17:07

    By the way, in regards to iKnow, I’m pretty sure at least some of the developers are familiar with this site, I wonder how much Khatz influenced them and indirectly gave us AJATTers thousands of sentences read by professional Japanese voice actors.

  30. Hashiriya
    December 20, 2008 at 03:40

    i think a lot of people say that the words on iKnow might be a little newspaper oriented… but i think if they thought of iKnow as just one big step on the stairs to fluency they would understand why it’s so useful… iKnow isn’t the sole source of becoming fluent in Japanese of course but it’s an invaluable resource when combined with other methods of study…

  31. mike d.
    December 20, 2008 at 04:24

    thanks khatz for the GITS scripts. i was looking for those. i was wondering if anybody has found scripts for evangelion?

  32. アムロ
    December 20, 2008 at 04:56

    This site has all the dialogue for several Gundam series.
    www.geocities.co.jp/AnimeComic-Pastel/3829/words01_Gundam.html

  33. Beck
    December 20, 2008 at 08:10

    新世紀エヴァンゲリオン: www.magi-system.org/old/eva/index.htm

    Damn I’m good at this. Maybe I should have my own blog.

  34. mike d.
    December 20, 2008 at 13:54

    wow, thanks Beck!

  35. Ben
    December 20, 2008 at 20:10

    I second the wish for a Samurai Champloo script. Alas 🙂

  36. ASKAYSCHA
    December 21, 2008 at 22:00

    I effin’ loved the videogame. God I still play it sometimes.
    THANK YER FOR THE SCRIPT!

  37. mike d.
    December 22, 2008 at 03:29

    i second the wish for a Cowboy Bebop script!

  38. December 25, 2008 at 07:24

    Thanks for the transcript and subtitle sites everyone, it’s something I’ve really been looking for.

    By the way, when you go looking for the transcripts of Japanese shows, what are the key terms you use in your searches?

    Best,
    Emergency

  39. Beck
    December 25, 2008 at 08:19

    mike d.: I posted one a few posts up www.occn.zaq.ne.jp/nohohon/bebop/ not every episode though. I wish I could find one for Samarai Champloo 🙁

    Emergency: “series name” せりふ, 台詞 or 台詞集

    Merry Christmas everyone. Don’t slack off on your Japanese. 油断せずに行こう.

  40. Beck
    December 25, 2008 at 08:21

    *Samurai Champloo I mean. I bought the manga hoping it was one of those direct transcription of the anime ones but it’s not. Still really good though.

    • Jonah
      November 28, 2011 at 10:13

      Has anyone managed to find subs for Samurai Champloo, and the rest of Cowboy Bebop? I’m still looking.. ;_;

  41. December 25, 2008 at 14:49

    @Beck-

    Thanks so much! メリークリスマス!

  42. mike d.
    December 25, 2008 at 20:35

    while i think that Gits: SAC is a great series, for those that are using it to study Japanese and are using the English dub, be careful because it apparently takes a lot of liberties.

    web.archive.org/web/20070508221846/http://www.valdostamuseum.org/hamsmith/GITStrans.html#Marxism

    shows the various edits made

  43. Nostrum
    January 1, 2009 at 14:48

    Thanks for the links everyone.. I was having difficulty finding scripts for stuff.

    I don’t know if other people can use this “google” thing better than me, but I would really like to have transcripts of:
    – Samurai Champloo (thirding it :P)
    – FLCL
    – Witch Hunter Robin
    – any good anime

    Any of those would be great 🙂

    @Beck
    haha you should make a blog

  44. cescoz
    January 3, 2009 at 00:34

    HI…
    someone have the transcriptions of full metal panic? I need only the first season
    thx all

  45. Chiro-kun
    January 5, 2009 at 00:41

    @nacest – YOU’RE MY HERO!!!!

  46. cescoz
    January 5, 2009 at 19:47

    Someone has the jap subs of the first season of full metal panic?
    thx

  47. Konta
    February 8, 2009 at 09:54

    Did anyone manage to copy and paste this into a file before the link went dead? Or is there another link?

  48. Arnaud
    July 2, 2009 at 18:05

    Hey,

    My computer cannot read the characters on this website:
    www.dramanote.com/?cid=32474

    But It can read japanese characters on other websites…

    How can I do?

  49. Chris
    July 23, 2009 at 23:39

    Thanks for the tip on this Khaz! Sadly, the link went down, but Google’s cache is still up.

    This show is fantastic for mining sentences… I love the way Batou talks, I find that most of my sentences come from him!

  50. matt
    July 26, 2009 at 01:28

    gispki.myhome.cx is down. Did anyone save offline copies of those amazing transcripts? Please?

  51. Chris
    July 26, 2009 at 23:50

    Google’s cache is down now, so I recommend people use the archive.org version instead:

    web.archive.org/web/20080202071607/gispki.myhome.cx/modules/bwiki/

  52. kaito
    September 19, 2009 at 09:19

    Hi guys, thanks for the scripts of Ghost in the shell. I’m looking for japanese transcripts of Saint Seiya and I was told that there were a japanese website that shut down one year ago that had them all. Unfortunately I can’t find its url with google so I can’t use the wayback machine. Any of you know where to find them ?

  53. January 8, 2010 at 23:54

    On the subject of Ghibli films (sort of), where can I download *English* subtitles? I want the English subtitles for Omohide Poro Poro so I can just really quickly process it into flash cards and get on with listening to it all the time…

  54. Sileh
    December 28, 2010 at 12:27

    @Chris

    Is there a file that you can download from the site you provided, in order to have japanese subs while watching the show? I have the DVD of Ghost in the Shell, and it would be really nice to have the subs going while watching it.

  55. gera
    March 24, 2011 at 05:05

    im looking for
    台詞コーナー】攻殼機動隊・・・全部だよ/ Exact Japanese Dialog Transcripts for Ghost In the Shell, Son!
    i found an article on this page, but the link is unavailable.
    www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/author/admin

    please help!

    Gera

  56. moaimoai
    September 22, 2011 at 14:38

    Here are subtitles if anyone else finds this useful:

    www.mediafire.com/?ywihczzzguwk54m 

  57. November 5, 2013 at 23:40

    Here’s a blog doing fortnightly transcriptions of celebrity interviews:

    japanesetranscripts.blogspot.co.uk/

  58. 山崎六郎
    February 29, 2016 at 19:26

    It’s not an exact transcript of the dialog by the way. However it is very close to exact.

  59. 山崎六郎
    March 1, 2016 at 03:54

    If anyone is interested I am doing a sentence pack for Ghost in the Shell. I am going in a sentence mining about 80-90% of entire episodes. So far I am nearly done with episode one of Stand Alone Complex.

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